Process

WOOD SELECTION
Everyone knows that wood has a lot to do with not only the appearance, but the sound of a guitar. There is a great variety of woods that give excellent sound - so fortunately a guitar can have woods that are selected for color and beauty - and they can sound great too!

I use only the finest select grades available. The sound boards are inspected by me personally to insure that they look and sound great - which means that they end up making beautiful guitars that sound good as well.
Cocobolo back with sapwood center - boolmatched.

Cocobolo back with sapwood center - boolmatched.

Bocote wood with rosewood/maple custom binding.

Bocote wood with rosewood/maple custom binding.

A classical 5-piece neck made from Spanish cedar.

A classical 5-piece neck made from Spanish cedar.

Pictured is a curly maple neck on a 000 steel string guitar.

Pictured is a curly maple neck on a 000 steel string guitar.

NECKS
Necks are carved by hand. Classical necks are one piece with a heel that extends into the sound chamber. The most common wood species for classical necks are cedro (Spanish cedar) and Honduran mahogany. Maple necks are popular as well, and have a great feel.

Acoustic steel string guitar necks are made from Honduran mahogany and occasionally maple. It is a little heavier, but much stronger for the tension that steel strings exert on the neck.
HEADSTOCK CARVING
I hand carve many of my headstocks - it is somewhat of a trademark. I really enjoy adding this detail to my guitars. Most of them are unique patterns on one guitar only.
Here is a copy of a 1904 Martin 1-45 headstock. I cut all the mother of pearl by hand.

Here is a copy of a 1904 Martin 1-45 headstock. I cut all the mother of pearl by hand.

A carved classical guitar headstock. This is a hummingbird carving.

A carved classical guitar headstock. This is a hummingbird carving.

Tentellones on  a classical cutaway guitar.

Tentellones on a classical cutaway guitar.

Another classical guitar with tentellones and side bracing.

Another classical guitar with tentellones and side bracing.

TENTELLONES
I use individual blocks (tentellones) on some guitars for lining. This is rarely done today as most builders use a kerfed strip of wood. My sides are bent exactly to shape without the use of a mold. The sides lay without any stress whatsoever as I glue each block into place. This ends up with a more resonant sound chamber with no stress in the wood to dampen vibration.
FRETBOARDS
My fretboards are bound - which means that there is no exposed metal fret edge showing along the side of the fingerboard. I cut a strip from each edge of the fingerboard and then cut fret slots in the center section. After the slots are cut, the strips are glued back on and the fret wire is installed.
Fretboard receiving frets - notice the concealed fret tangs.

Fretboard receiving frets - notice the concealed fret tangs.

A finished guitar revealing the bound fretboard.

A finished guitar revealing the bound fretboard.