Panormo build - page 2

Side Bending
In this photo I’m bending the cocobolo sides. Cocobolo is very stiff, and takes a fair amount of pressure to bend. I will bend the sides very close to the correct shape and then let them set until I’m ready to fine tune the curves and glue the body together.
Bending the Sides

Bending the Sides

Pearl pieces ready to install

Pearl pieces ready to install

Mother of Pearl Inlays

Mother of Pearl Inlays

Making the Rosette
Now I will focus my attention on the rosette. Panormo used the pearl lozenge/diamond pattern on several of his guitars as did the earlier Antonio Stradivari. This requires many little pieces of mother of pearl to be cut. I’ve done the tedious hand-cutting and you see the pieces ready for assembly. Each piece of pearl has been glued into place by hand. I’ll mix some epoxy with ebony dust and make a paste to fill the rest of the routed groove.
Rosette With Inlaid MOP
Here you see the epoxy paste has cured and I’ve sanded it flush with the top. I have also routed several small grooves which will accept the tiny wood purfling strips which will complete the rosette.
Mother of Pearl Inlay

Mother of Pearl Inlay

Original Panormo Rosette

Original Panormo Rosette

My new rosette

My new rosette

Final Rosette
A photo of an original 1827 Panormo rosette is to the left. On the right you can see my completed rosette. All it needs is about 170 years to look just like the original!
Bracing the Top
Fan bracing was a relatively new concept for guitars of this time period. A variety of bracing patterns are found on Panormo’s guitars, but he made many with a fan variation. This bracing pattern is similar to an asymmetrical fan bracing system he used. The shorter angled strut is on the treble side of the sound board and is designed to strengthen the higher frequencies.
Braced Panormo Top

Braced Panormo Top

Gluing the Neck

Gluing the Neck

Attaching the Neck
With the fan bracing finished, I glue the sound board to the neck to prepare for assembly of the guitar sides. Alignment is critical in this step.
Fitting the Sides
The tail block has been glued into place, and I am trial fitting the sides. I want the side to lay perfectly in place without requiring any force to hold it in position. The goal is to have the wood perfectly at rest so that it will vibrate freely when excited by the plucked strings.
Fitting the Sides

Fitting the Sides

Clamping the Tentellones

Clamping the Tentellones

Gluing the Tentellones
Individual wood glue blocks (tentellones) are glued into place to adhere the sides to the top. This method assures that there is no stress built into the guitar. The tall maple clips hold the tentellones in place while the glue bonds.
Adding the Lining
The sides have been glued to the top with the little individual blocks (tentellones). I have bent some solid wood lining and glued and clamped it in this photo. The scorched side wood is really not burnt, but looks as though it is. The heavy oils in cocobolo char on the surface of the wood - it is easily sanded off later.
Clamping the Lining

Clamping the Lining

Clamping the back strip

Clamping the back strip

The Back Reinforcing Strip
The guitar is soon to be ready for the back - so I’ll get the back reenforcing strip glued on. Panormo used an unusually wide strip - I made mine about 35mm wide for this guitar.